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Environmental Engineering

Bachelor of Science

Environmental engineers minimize our impact on the local, regional and global environment and improve our standard of living. They face unique issues and must have a strong background in the fundamental earth sciences. 

As problem solvers for something as diverse as “the environment,” they also need to understand the most current technologies and have a desire to maintain a high level of learning in this rapidly evolving field.

Watch this NSF video and find out what it's like to be an Environmental Engineer.

Environmental Engineers can specialize in areas of drinking water and wastewater treatment. Turning river, lake and even seawater into drinking water is a unique expertise and takes great understanding as each water source offers distinctive challenges.

Air pollution has also become a great concern on scales ranging from the global atmosphere to the indoor environment. From a fundamental understanding of the chemistry and dynamics of air pollution, students learn how human activities degrade air quality and also how to evaluate and design control technology to reduce emissions from industry and other sources.

The recent push for sustainable infrastructure in terms of energy and environment is yet another challenge environmental engineers will have the opportunity to address in their careers. As well as looking at the correlation between toxic elements in the soil and how they relate to food safety.

ericfarrowandarsenicriceresearch.jpg
Eric Farrow is researching ways to reduce the arsenic content in rice. He wants to make sure the rice that ends up on your plate is toxin-free. Read more »

Environmental engineers may work on project teams with health care professionals, city planners, developers and all types of engineers.

Environmental Engineers are hired by:

  • Consulting Firms
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • State Natural Resource Departments
  • State Health Departments
  • U.S. Departments of Energy and Defense
  • Public Works Departments
  • Colleges and Universities
  • Manufacturing Industries



Environmental Engineering Admission Criteria
Effective Fall 2013

The following guidelines are used to evaluate applications for first-time admission to the environmental engineering degree program:

  1. Not currently on probation or deficiency status.
  2. Completed all required courses in the common Freshman Engineering Program.
  3. A cumulative GPA ≥ 2.0. The cumulative GPA includes both S&T and transfer courses. It includes any GPA adjustment from the grade replacement policy. The student must complete any and all paperwork to effect all desired grade replacements prior to applying for admission to the environmental engineering program.
  4. UM cumulative GPA ≥ 2.0. The UM cumulative GPA includes courses taken at any of the University of Missouri campuses. It includes all grades for any repeated courses, with no GPA adjustment from the grade replacement policy.

Students are allowed to continue taking sophomore level environmental engineering courses in order to satisfy the admission requirements and re-apply for admission if necessary. However, for a student to graduate from the environmental engineering program, official admission to the program must occur before the student begins to enroll in courses identified as junior year courses in the undergraduate catalog.

 

 

 

Emphasis Areas:

- Air Pollution and Control

- Environmental Chemistry

- Environmental Microbiology

- Geoenvironmental Engineering

- Water and Wastewater
   Resources Engineering

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Courses:
You can browse courses
by downloading the S&T
Undergraduate Catalog
located on the Registrar's
website. View catalog »

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Advising:
You may download the flowchart below to assist in advising and course selection.‌

EnvE Flowchart FS14.pdf

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